Caloric Values for a Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner

                Today we will be discussing the caloric value of a traditional Thanksgiving dinner: 1)      Turkey:  6 oz (1/2 cup) is anywhere between 151 and 420 calories.  2)      Gravy: ½ cup 60-80 calories 3)      Mashed potatoes:  anywhere from 111 to 171 calories for ½ or ¾ of a cup 4)      Sweet potatoes: between 155 and […]

shutter stock turkey dinner

                Today we will be discussing the caloric value of a traditional Thanksgiving dinner:

1)      Turkey:  6 oz (1/2 cup) is anywhere between 151 and 420 calories. 

2)      Gravy: ½ cup 60-80 calories

3)      Mashed potatoes:  anywhere from 111 to 171 calories for ½ or ¾ of a cup

4)      Sweet potatoes: between 155 and 249 calories.  (the sweeter they are, the more calories they are likely to have) 

5)      Cranberry sauce:   about 100 calories for ¼ of a cup. 

6)      Stuffing has a huge range of calories depending on how it is made.  I found the range can be from 170 to 410 calories.  The Stove Top stuff is what came in at 170 calories.

7)      Apple pie: between 300 and 517 calories

8)      Pumpkin pie: between 228 and 284 calories.

 

  Total all of these items up and you are looking at anywhere between 1275 and 2241 calories per ONE serving.  That is one calorie filled meal! 

So do you skip the holiday meal? No way!  How about trying to be proactive?  Many towns have “Turkey Trots” which are organized 5k, 10k or ½ marathons on Thanksgiving morning.  Even if you are not a runner there is no law that says you can’t walk, so get a friend and start at the back of the pack and burn off some of the calories you will be ingesting later.  If you can’t find an organized race near you, you can always put your sneakers on and go outside for a walk/run in your own neighborhood.  An hour of running (5mph for a 138lb female) will burn 658 calories.  Walking briskly can burn 362 calories an hour, and simply walking the dog can burn 271 calories an hour.  Use this knowledge to have a healthy turkey day!

Sophie Pratola

704 604-1518

www.personallytrainedbysophie.com

Why you should incorporate metabolic conditioning in your workouts

            One of the newer fads in exercise is something called metabolic conditioning (metcon).  It isn’t for the faint of heart.  It is a grueling workout designed to bring you to exhaustion.  The goal of the workout is to elicit chemical changes in the body that lead to maximal caloric burns following the workout.  These […]

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            One of the newer fads in exercise is something called metabolic conditioning (metcon).  It isn’t for the faint of heart.  It is a grueling workout designed to bring you to exhaustion.  The goal of the workout is to elicit chemical changes in the body that lead to maximal caloric burns following the workout.  These workouts utilize all three of your major energy systems.  This results in increases in lactic acid levels and the release of several hormones which in turn, leads to EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen consumption).  When you create EPOC you have an after burn that lasts for up to 48hours after completing the workout.  What this means (for those of you needing a translation) is you will still be burning calories at an elevated rate for as many as 2 days after doing a workout like this.   Another benefit of metcon is that it only takes about 20-30 minutes to do.  There are 4 major goals of a metcon workout:

 1.) Use heavy weight (body weight can be used if heavy weights are unavailable)

 2.) Feel like you are sprinting (become completely breathless)

 3.) Create a lot of sweat (heat is key for chemical response)

 4.) Achieve metabolic failure (meaning you’ve created so much lactic acid that you absolutely have to take a break because your body can’t do anymore work).

 There are many different techniques to achieve a metcon workout such as Tabata training, time based workouts, 10-40 workouts, descending reps workouts, and 3×3 workouts.  Remember, everybody is different, but to see maximal results you need to push yourself during these workouts until you can’t do anymore, and then rest only long enough until you can push yourself again.

 

Sophie Pratola

704-604-1518

Personally Trained By Sophie